How To Fall In Love With Taking Care of Yourself After Grief

We can never be absolutely prepared for losses, even if common sense tells us that they are inevitable. And when this happens, the only thing we can do is accept our grief, recognize our feelings and acknowledge the fact that life goes on anyway. Life continues for you, including - and therefore, taking care of yourself is the best thing you can do for yourself, your family and your beloved people who are with you now. And not with you either. Let's try to get started.

VALENTINE’S DAY HEALING HEART

Surviving holidays as a widower, especially as a new widower, is always tricky.  As an advocate for widowers, I have noticed how most widowers have one or two holidays that are harder than others to deal with, for they are laced with cherished memories that are more valuable than the Crown Jewels of England. For me, Valentine’s Day is one of those days. With perfect regularity, February 14th is always sure to give me pause, as each year I’m reminded of the sixteen years I celebrated it with Michelle.

Changing Your Career When Grieving: Perks and Pitfalls

No one can rush getting back to normal after the death of a beloved one. In fact, grief left behind after a devastating loss is one of life’s most difficult experiences to cope with. And returning to work while grieving is the most challenging experience. You are sad, anxious, frightened, full of countless thoughts, and angry. But then you are required to return to work.

RIP Kobe Bryant

 

I got to see Kobe play once.

It was the semi final game of the 2012 Olympics. Team USA was playing Spain (I think). I remember thinking what a treat it was to be at the Olympics and getting to watch a group of people who had dedicated their lives to be the best in the world at what they did.

The last 48 hours I've been reflecting a lot on my own life in light of the tragedy of Kobe Bryant's unexpected passing on Sunday. There are a few thoughts that I want to pass onto you {First Name}.

Reflections on Life Lessons Learned from Death 10 Years Later

 

My Dad died on Monday February 1st, 2010.

I had the good fortune to speak with my Dad on Sunday January 31st, 2010.

I say good fortune because looking back on that day 10 years later,  I feel like I won the lottery having had the opportunity to speak with him just one day before his passing.

My Dad and I did not talk regularly – I held onto childhood baggage that I allowed to keep me at a distance.  Our relationship was alright, which I recognize is much better than the relationships many kids have with their parents.